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Editors tell their stories; change minds

Posted by on May 23, 2015 in Blog, Making a Difference | 0 comments

Telling an unfiltered story to peers is sometimes difficult. Telling your own story about your sexuality can be even more difficult. Three editors of The Howler at Monarch High School In Louisville, Colorado, found a way to tell the stories they knew needed to be published. The end result created a place where all kids in the LGBT community could feel safe and appreciated at school.

According the their adviser, Bonnie Katzive, the “editors deliberately presented the interview subjects telling their own stories, as opposed to letting them be filtered by a writer. Editors initiated a conversation with administrators to establish whether or not the profanity would be seen as problematic. Our principal merely said she would forward complaints about content or language to our Editors in Chief. (No one complained.) The adviser for the school Gay Straight Association believes the openness of these three seniors allowed younger students to feel safer being out at school, observed a noticeable increase in same-sex couples attending Prom this year, and attributed increasing openness in part to the article.”

The double page spread can be accessed here. Monarch HS – Issue 3 Page 8&9 (1).

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How to apply to Making a Difference
and examine previous stories

Posted by on Mar 25, 2014 in Blog, Featured, Making a Difference, News, Scholastic Journalism, Teaching | 0 comments

 

The first Making a Difference in 1988 showed how students reported the impact of the Hazelwood decision.

The first Making a Difference in 1988 showed how students reported the impact of the Hazelwood decision.

Advisers, as you publish your students’ work, by print, broadcast or web, consider sharing your pieces that created change, reported significant issues or fulfilled the journalistic concept of social responsibility with the JEA Scholastic Press Rights Committee’s Making a Difference project.

We want to make our posts monthly. These posts will highlight students who have made a difference through their reporting. When your students create content that has a positive impact on your school or community, and fulfills the concept of social responsibility, please fill out the submission form and we’ll tell you how to submit your content.

JEA Scholastic Press Rights Committee will post one or more packages a month on its website and promote them on social media.

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We published our first copy of Making a Difference in hard copy in 1988 because of the Hazelwood malaise. In that version, now downloadable, we highlighted scholastic reporting that demonstrated  student journalism did not need the heavy hand of prior review and censorship. That tradition continues today and will continue so long as students continue to take their roles seriously and professionally.

In 2012, we committed ourselves to updating the project, hoping to show student journalism had not succumbed to Hazelwood.

We have seen some great work by student journalists across the country covering some intense topics. Let’s show the country what great work student journalists are doing that rivals work done by professional journalists.

Here are some of the stories submitted earlier:

Making a Difference articles – 2015

McKinney students get it right
 Journalists document controversy challenging community
• Don’t drink the water
• Students report on shattered dreams
Students support peers across the country in censorship case
Documenting biodiversity in chicagoland
Student promotes need for sex education

Making a Difference articles – 2014

Students speak out about cancellation of SGA elections
And the children shall lead them. Student journalists Make a Difference
Student journalists make a difference
Making a Difference: Student journalists document controversy
Broken Hearts and Broken Minds
Students tackle coverage of rape culture
• Freshman capstone project localizes national issue of gay rights
• Guns in America: From schools to shooting ranges
Students speak out about cancellations of SGA election
Freshman capstone project localizes national issues of gay rights
Exposing the killing impact of Heroin
Students support peers across the country in censorship case
• Make history come alive by interviewing local veterans

Past student work:
Past stories: You can Make a Difference. Show everyone how

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