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Censorship and broadcasting video

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Censorship and broadcasting video

by Chris Waugaman

Primary Common Core state standards addressed

(see http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy )

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

Brief goal/outcome statement:
This would be intended to be a lesson I would use with producers in my broadcasting class or even my online editors who often use video and stream events.

  • Students will learn terms that familiarize them with censorship in video and radio.
  • Students will use their skills at gathering information and using online sources to guide them in times of legal uncertainty.
  • Students will learn how to make critical decisions regarding their press rights by applying the case outcomes they learn in this lesson.
• COMPREHENSION • PRACTICE •APPLICATION • REFLECTION
 

·       Gathering Information

·       Documentation

·       Note-taking

 

 

·       Using web as resource

·       Responding to questions

·       Documentation

 

·       Using modern events to make decisions for their staff

 

 

·       Describe the process of video censorship

·       Discuss other possible scenarios that can occur

 

Unit: Scholastic Press Rights

Lesson – Censorship and Broadcasting

Length of lesson: One 90 minute block (35 minutes instruction/45 minutes activity/10 minute reflection)

Resources/Equipment:

Handouts/Internet/Computer

  1. Introduction & Instruction: The instruction aspect of this lesson includes instruction in what is the FCC and how is video normally regulated. Students will understand what most news broadcast organizations are required to consider when broadcasting.

There will also be a clear indication of what is required to be censored with video. It would be helpful if students are familiar with the Hazelwood court case and the Tinker court case before this lesson, but it is not a requirement.

Who governs free speech on radio and television? What is censorable on television?

https://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/faqs-television-and-cable

https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us/articles/202731600-Obscene-Indecent-and-Profane-Broadcasts

For most high school programs, students publish videos online. The FCC does not govern such publication; however, students can still make decisions with this knowledge. 

With the following case students should consider a few factors in relating to the content and situation at hand: 

  • Is the video part of a school sponsored publication or is it for an individual?
  • What is the publication’s forum status?
  • Is there a valid educational purpose for censoring? (Hazelwood)
  • Can the administration predict a reasonable disruption of the school activities or will it present an invasion of privacy? (Tinker) 

In the following case, a student shot video of a post-fight activity in a school. That camera was confiscated along with the video. Read the following account or what happened, and the SPLC response to determine if the student’s rights were violated.

Seizing video of a fight
http://www.splc.org/article/2004/08/officials-seize-video-of-fight-from-student

Article about video of school fight and SPLC position:
http://www.splc.org/article/2004/04/n-y-high-school-principal-confiscates-tape-of-school-fight

  • We will briefly explain what happened in this case from 2004.
  • We will cover the Privacy Protection Act and how it might apply to this case. http://www.splc.org/article/2002/01/student-media-guide-to-the-privacy-protection-act
  • Next I ask the students to identify what in the school handbook should protect this student journalist.
  • As a final element to the 35-minute discussion I ask the students to conclude if this scenario impacts our publication and work.

Key pages such as the SPLC web page will be introduced as a primary source for research as it involves the law of the student press.

List of other helpful websites:

http://www.collegefreedom.org
http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/
http://teachfirstamendment.org/
http://www.freedomforum.org/
http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/
http://www.nfoic.org/
http://jeapressrights.org/
http://www.splc.org

Sometimes this will take longer than 35 minutes.

  1. Practice: Students will pick from one of the following cases chronicled on the SPLC site.
    • http://www.splc.org/blog/splc/2015/06/judge-rules-security-videos-subject-to-ferpa-protections
    http://www.splc.org/blog/splc/2014/11/connecticut-school-security-video-ruled-exempt-from-ferpa
    • http://www.splc.org/blog/splc/2014/02/students-lewd-video-about-teacher-provokes-errant-wisconsin-ruling-applying-online-harassment-law
    • http://www.splc.org/article/2004/04/ill-school-refuses-to-allow-students-to-air-video-tribute-of-deceased-student
    • http://www.splc.org/article/2004/06/calif-university-bars-student-from-airing-beheading-video-on-school-sponsored-tv
    • http://www.splc.org/article/2015/02/western-illinois-u-editor-reinstated-after-suspension-for-freelancing-video-of-campus-brawl
    • http://www.splc.org/article/2012/03/u-of-rhode-island-proposal-would-bar-photos-video-of-sensitive-material

They will read the article and answer the questions below to the best of their ability.

Students need to be prepared to briefly describe what happened in the case they have chosen to the class. They can brief the class by presenting their responses to the questions.
• Who does the case involve?
• What happened in the case? How does it involve video?
• Who has made the decision?
• Was this case similar to any other cases you have heard about? What was it?
• How does this situation relate to Hazelwood or Tinker?
• Does the video include anything that is obscene, indecent, or profane?
• How could this case set a precedent?
• Name and document any other sources from the web that pertain to this case.

III. Application: Have students decide together which case could most likely occur this school year.

Students should outline a policy in their staff manual that will inform students how to proceed should a similar scenario to the one that they have researched could develop.

The policy should be agreed upon by the entire staff and be introduced to the administration, along with any updates on the staff manual, for the year.

  1. Reflection: Have students write in their logs details about what new considerations they have thought of after learning about video censorship. It can be as structured as you would like or as open as “what did you learn during the process of researching your topic that you did not realize would happen simply by following the examples I explained at the beginning of the lesson.”
  1. Assessment: Credit for completing questions on case. Credit for hypothetical scenario. Credit for reflection in daily log. Each assignment is worth 33% of the total unit grade. See RUBRIC ON NEXT PAGE.
  2. Assessment: Credit for completing questions on researching topic. Credit for hypothetical scenario. Credit for reflection in daily log. Each assignment is worth 33 percent of the total unit grade.

 

Grade A (100) B (90) C (80) D (70)
 

Questions on Selected Topic

 

 

All questions are answered thoroughly with great detail included about case and sources (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

 

All questions are answered adequately with some detail included about case and sources (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

 

Most questions are answered. Question 6 must be answered.

 

 

Some questions are answered. Question 6 must be answered.

 

Paper with Scenario

 

 

The created scenario must be on topic with a great amount of detail included about case and sources (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

 

The created scenario must be on topic with enough details to answer questions from activity one (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

 

The created scenario addresses topic and answers most of the questions from activity one (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

 

A scenario is created and it answers some of the questions from activity one (Special Attention Ques 6).

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

The reflection includes details about the process of online research. Some details are included. It reflects an understanding of the process and a response to the activity,

 

The reflection addresses the process of online research. It reflects an understanding of the process and a response to the activity,

 

The reflection shows an understanding of the process and a response to the activity,

 

It responds to the activity,

 

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