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The process of deciding staff editorials QT41

Posted by on Jan 7, 2018 in Blog, Ethical Issues, Quick Tips, Teaching | 0 comments

Keys to effective editorials include focused positions, credible sources and meaningful topics. If the topic is focused on issues and problems, strong editorials include a call to action or possible solutions.

Ideas for topics should be discussed throughout the deadline cycle. The editorial board will select the topic, and a member of the editorial board will write it as an unsigned editorial.

In general, student reporters should consider reinforcing the importance of key stories with local impact and importance by preparing staff editorials that take a definitive stance.

Editorials are least effective and meaningful when they approach topics other than the  mundane.

Key points/action

Staff editorials, the position of the student media on topics of importance and interest, require thorough planning and credible sources and arguments for support.

Student media show leadership in many ways, and one of the most traditional is through concise, focused and authoritative statements of well argued and supported opinion that represents the institutional voice of the student media.

Stance

In general, student reporters should consider reinforcing the importance of key stories with local impact and importance by preparing staff editorials that take a definitive stance. Editorials are least effective and meaningful when they approach topics other than the mundane.

Such leadership pieces should not be exclusively negative or positive. They can offer solutions, alternatives, commendation and/or points for compromise. They should make statements and not ask questions.

Reasoning/suggestions:

Keys to effective editorials include focused positions, credible sources and meaningful topics. If the topic is focused on issues and problems, strong editorials include a call to action.

Ideas for topics should be discussed throughout the deadline cycle. The editorial board will select the topic, and a member of the editorial board will write it as an unsigned editorial.

Staffs may set their own policies, but the staff editorial need not reflect the views of all editorial board members.

Editorials can still play an important role in today’s media.

Related: These points and other decisions about mission statement, forum status and editorial policy should be part of a Foundations Package  that protects journalistically responsible student expression.

Resources:

Quick Hit: Picking a topic for staff editorials, JEA Scholastic Press Committee

Quick Hit: Importance of staff editorials, JEA Scholastic Press Committee

Mirror, mirror on the wall,” JEA Scholastic Press Committee

Where have the leaders gone?” JEA Scholastic Press Committee

Editorials under attack, Student Press Law Center

They need the freedom to make mistakes, too,” Lindsay Coppens, JEA Press Rights Committee

Explained: why newspapers endorse presidential candidates, Dylan Baddour, Houston Chronicle

Reading newspapers: Editorial and opinion pieces, Learn NC

Video: How to write an editorial, New York Times

Writing an Editorial, Alan Weintraut

 

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Seeking to cure the Hazelwood Blues

Posted by on Jan 8, 2013 in Blog, Hazelwood, Law and Ethics, News, Scholastic Journalism | 0 comments

 

Weighted down by the Hazelwood blues? Try these resources. #25HZLWD http://jeasprc.org/seekingcure

One way to commemorate Hazelwood’s 25th anniversary is to take steps to control its effects. Here are our recommendations for an Action Plan to begin to find a cure for Hazelwood.

Additionally, check out the SPLC’s 5 simple steps you can make sure Hazelwood never turns 50.

Below the Action Plan you will find a daily listing of links we will post to Twitter and links that go to resources to assist you and your students to support the SPLC in its efforts to find the Hazelwood Cure.

1) Educate yourself about the importance of student press freedom. Why should students make decisions?
• For advisers: JEA guidelines for advisers — specifically areas 5-9 http://jea.org/home/for-educators/model-guidelines/
• For students: http://www.studentpress.org/nspa/wheel.html (seventh item down, specifically 1.4-1.6 and 5.2-5.3)

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Start your new year with a call to action: Hazelwood anniversary looms

Posted by on Dec 18, 2012 in Blog, Law and Ethics, News, Scholastic Journalism, Teaching | 0 comments

hazelwoodBWby Megan Fromm
Yes, students, there is a Grinch. And its name is Hazelwood.

On January 13, 2013 student journalists and advisers across the country will (begrudgingly) commemorate 25 years of Hazelwood censorship.

In the hopes of inspiring change, dialogue and ultimately greater scholastic press freedom for all students, SPRC is finalizing its 25th Anniversary Hazelwood Teacher’s Kit.

This kit will include:

  • promotional materials for commemorating the event
  • lesson plans to better understand student press rights and combat Hazelwood censorship
  • a news release to engage your local journalists
  • a letter to administrators
  • and more!

Most importantly, the SPRC has created specific calls to action for students and advisers. We will also be live-tweeting resources and ideas throughout the month of January.

In partnership with the Student Press Law Center’s “Cure Hazelwood” campaign (www.curehazelwood.org), we encourage all scholastic journalists and advisers to put the 25th anniversary of the Hazelwood decision on your agenda.

Just imagine what could happen if scholastic journalists from schools across the nation made a collective, informed, impassioned plea for freedom. What a difference we could make!

So, this holiday season, we hope you will kick back, enjoy the festivities, and keep tabs on the SPRC blog for our upcoming teacher kit. Let’s make 2013 the year Hazelwood takes a hike!

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