Posts Tagged "Scholastic Journalism"

Making a Difference application now open

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Advisers, as you prepare for the end of year contest submissions, consider entering student work in the JEA Scholastic Press Rights Commission Making a Difference project. You can fill out this online form and upload documents for consideration for publication.

We published our first copy of Making a Difference in hard copy in 1988 because of the Hazelwood malaise. In that version, now downloadable, we highlighted scholastic reporting that demonstrated  student journalism did not need the heavy hard of prior review and censorship. That tradition continues today and will continue so long as students continue to take their roles seriously and professionally.

In 2012, we committed ourselves to updating the project, hoping to show student journalism had not succumbed to Hazelwood.

We have seen some great work by student journalists across the country covering some intense topics. Let’s show the country what great work student journalists are doing that rivals work done by professional journalists.

You can enter your students’ work here: http://tinyurl.com/bmz6m5r

Here are some of the stories submitted earlier:

Making a Difference articles – 2014

• Students speak out about cancellation of SGA elections
http://jeasprc.org/students-speak-out-about-cancellation-of-sga-elections/

• And the children shall lead them. Student journalists Make a Difference
http://jeasprc.org/and-the-children-shall-lead-them-student-journalists-make-a-difference/
• Student journalists make a difference
http://jeasprc.org/student-journalists-make-a-difference/
• Making a Difference: Student journalists document controversy
http://jeasprc.org/making-a-difference-student-journalists-document-controversy-challenging-community/
• Broken Hearts and Broken Minds
http://jeasprc.org/broken_hearts_broken_minds/
• Students tackle coverage of rape culture
http://jeasprc.org/students-tackle-coverage-of-rape-culture/
• Freshman capstone project localizes national issue of gay rights
http://jeasprc.org/making-a-difference-freshman-capstone-project-localizes-national-issue-of-gay-rights/
 Guns in America: From schools to shooting ranges
http://jeasprc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Feb2013_Urban_Legend_To_Email.pdf
• Students speak out about cancellations of SGA elections
http://jeasprc.org/students-speak-out-about-cancellation-of-sga-elections/
• Freshman capstone project localizes national issues of gay rights
http://jeasprc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Gay-Rights.pdf
• Exposing the killing impact of Heroin
http://jeasprc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Page-1-November-2012.pdf

Past student work:
• Past stories: You can Make a Difference. Show everyone how
http://jeasprc.org/tweet24-you-can-make-a-difference-show-everyone-how/

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Fond du Lac English department
posts support for students
in censorship fight

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Fond du Lac (WI) High’s English department has submitted a statement supporting student journalists and advocating the need for an open forum for student expression at their school.

Student journalists there have been in a prior review and restraint battle with school officials over a story on rape, called “Rape Joke.”

Kettle Moraine Press Association director Linda Barrington also noted the students aired  a video on school announcements March 21, with administration approval. The video had some explanation from the principal about why he thinks the guidelines for prior review are needed.

The video can be seen here.

Arguments made on the video include the general thought that the school would like more oversight, the thought that some of the words used in the story were too edgy, and a reference to the argument the principal has been giving lately that reporters should have gotten the permission from the rapists who may have been involved in the stories of sexual abuse related by the anonymous sources in the “Rape Joke” story.

Barrington said in am email to the Journalism Education Association’s listserv that the next school board meeting for the district is Monday, March 24 at 5 pm at the Fond du Lac School District Administration Center at 72 Ninth St.

“Students are looking for as much support there as possible,” Barrington wrote.

Students journalists have received more than 5,300 signatures on a petition to their superintendent to reverse his prior review and censorship decision.

Additional coverage links:
• Trust kids to speak
http://www.redeyechicago.com/news/censoring-rape-high-school-20140320,0,1091161.story
• High school student protest censorship of the ‘The Rape Joke,’ school publication restriction
http://www.stevenspointjournal.com/article/20140312/SPJ01/303120258/High-school-students-protest-censorship-Rape-Joke-school-publication-restrictions
• Fond du Lac student protest censorship mandate for school publication
http://www.sheboyganpress.com/article/20140312/SHE0101/303120232/Fond-du-Lac-students-protest-censorship-mandate-school-publication
• High school cracks down on student paper that published rape culture article
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/13/fond-du-lac-rape-article_n_4959167.html
•How far is too far? The issue of rape in the high school
http://wisoapbox.blogspot.com/2014/03/how-far-is-too-far-issue-of-rape-in.html
• High school administration teaches student journalists valuable lesson: We will censor you early and often
http://wonkette.com/543939/high-school-administration-teaches-student-journalists-valuable-lesson-we-will-censor-you-early-and-often
• oped: Rape culture article in school paper leads to censorship policy
http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/politics/rape-culture-article-in-school-paper-leads-to-censorship-policy/article/376415
• Wisconsin administrators impose prior review after news magazine’s story on sexual assault
http://www.splc.org/news/newsflash.asp?id=2691
• Principal requires approval of high school paper’s stories after rape culture article
http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/mediawire/243237/principal-requires-approval-of-high-school-papers-stories-after-rape-culture-article/
• WI school offices seize control  over student paper after ‘rape culture’ article appears
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/03/12/wi-school-officials-seize-control-over-student-paper-after-rape-culture-article-appears/

 

 

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High School Students, Teachers
Experience Student Media Censorship

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More than 25 years after the Supreme Court limited First Amendment protections for high school student journalists, a survey of students and media advisers attending a national scholastic journalism convention indicates censorship is a fact of life in many schools. SJW-2014

Of the 5,506 students and teachers who attended the National High School Journalism Convention in Boston, Mass., Nov. 14-17, 2013, 531 students and 69 advisers responded to survey questions asking about their experiences with censorship of student media.

Significant numbers of both students (32 percent) and advisers (39 percent) said school officials had told them not to publish or air something. Thirty-two percent of advisers reported a school official reviews the content of their student news medium before it is published or aired.  And 60 percent of students said someone other than student editors had the final authority to determine the content of the student media they advise.

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Six schools earn First Amendment
Press Freedom Award

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SJW-2014A committee with representatives from the Journalism Education Association, National Scholastic Press Association and Quill and Scroll International Honorary Society is pleased to announce the six winners of the 2014 First Amendment Press Freedom Award.

The award recognizes  high schools that actively support, teach and protect First Amendment rights and responsibilities of students and teachers, with an emphasis on student-run media where students make all final decisions of content.

As in previous years, schools competed for the title by first answering questionnaires submitted by an adviser and at least one editor; those who advanced to the next level were asked to provide responses from the principal and all publications advisers and student editors, indicating their support of the five freedoms. In addition, semifinalists submitted samples of their printed policies.

2014 First Amendment Press Freedom Award winners are as follows:
Convent of the Sacred Heart High School, San Francisco, Calif.
Francis Howell North High School, St. Charles, Mo.
Kirkwood High School. Kirkwood, Mo.
Mountlake Terrace High School, Mountlake Terrace, Wash.
North Central High School, Indianapolis, Ind.
Townsend Harris High School, Flushing, N.Y.

These schools will be honored April 10 at the opening ceremony of the JEA/NSPA Spring National High School Journalism Convention in San Diego.

Two of the schools are first-time recipients: North Central High School  and Convent of the Sacred Heart, which is not only a first-time awardee, but the second private school to ever be recognized.

“We are proud of each of these schools for supporting their student media as they practice critical life skills like decision making, critical thinking and civic engagement while informing their audiences,” JEA Scholastic Press Rights Commission chairman said.

This is the 14th year for the recognition. The award, which began with an emphasis on student publications, was originally titled Let Freedom Ring, and later expanded to include the other freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment.

First round applications are due annually by Dec. 1. Downloadable applications for 2015 will be available on the JEA website in the fall.

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When law and ethics and good journalism combine

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PART 1 OF a 3-PART SERIES

An experienced Ohio newspaper adviser teams up with a former student — who now has a law degree — to teach the staff about using public records. An alleged rape on campus requires student editors to stand their ground accessing information about it. Once they have details about the incident, they have to decide just what they should – or maybe should not – use. It’s a tale that has all the makings of excellent reporting.

The backstory

Journalism teacher Natalie Sekicky admits she’s lucky. Anyone with a full teaching load and student media to advise can usually only dream about being able to put staffers in teams and work with them as they investigate complicated, in-depth stories.

But then Sekicky’s former editor-in-chief Emily Grannis, a college journalism major, started giving “quick lessons” about record requests to the J1 classes while she was home on breaks. When she entered a nearby law school, she said she was able to work “more formally” with the Shaker Heights students.

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