Pages Navigation Menu
PANIC BUTTON

Empowering student decision-making QT22

Posted by on Oct 18, 2017 in Blog, Ethical Issues, Quick Tips, Scholastic Journalism, Teaching | 0 comments

The role of the adviser in student-run media incorporates teacher, coach, counselor, listener and devil’s advocate but not doer. We like the JEA Adviser Code of Ethics as guides for advisers.

That role means letting students make all decisions including content, context and grammar.

One way advisers can help this process is by having a staff manual inclusive of the student media mission statement, policies, guidelines and procedures. The mission statement outlines the overall aim of the student media. Policies are either the board-level or media-level and state the functionality of the student press. Guidelines are the ethical components the student media will work with. The procedures and resources for students to learn how to do something.

 

Guideline:

As per the board-level or media-level policy, students should be empowered to make all content decisions for student media.

Social media post/question:

What do you do in the instance of who should make the content decisions?

Stance:

Students learn best when they are empowered to make their own decisions with support from the adviser on the sideline. A clear understanding of the adviser’s role helps students take ownership of their work and the program overall.

Reasoning/suggestions:

Students should be empowered to make all content decisions for student media. Instead of making the decisions, advisers should advise and ask questions to help the students examine the issue from multiple perspectives and concerns.

One way advisers can help this process is by having a staff manual inclusive of the student media mission statement, policies, guidelines and procedures. The mission statement outlines the overall aim of the student media. Policies are either the board-level or media-level and act as a constitution for the student press. Guidelines are the ethical components the student media will work with. The procedures and resources for students to learn how to do something.

If students know (or can look at what to do) what By already establishing these prior to a problem happening, it’s easier to see what to do when something does happen. (And, it will.) These policies, guidelines and procedures should function as a reference and be complete (preferably) prior to the problem happening. This helps the students (and adviser) work through issues if they do happen.

Resources:

Female High School Students Bear the Burden of Censorship, SPLC

Curing Hazelwood package, SPRC

The Role of Student Media: Foundations Package, SPRC

SPLC resources, SPLC

JEA Adviser Code of Ethics

 

Read More

Second day concerns

Posted by on Aug 14, 2017 in Blog, Law and Ethics, News, Scholastic Journalism, Teaching | 0 comments

by Lori Keekley

It’s not the first day of school that has me worried. It’s the second.

St. Louis Park’s first day involves some get-to-know-you activity, but we start content on the second. And this is why I’m worried.

With the summer of fake news and recent news of the events of Charlottesville, Virginia, I want my students to understand why what they do is so important.

So, on the second day, we will revisit our mission statement.

I want them to understand the importance of giving voice to the voiceless as both the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics and Poynter’s Guiding Principles state. I will have them read Columbia Journalism Review’s article, “The Voiceless have a Voice. A Journalist’s Job is to Amplify it.

I want our students who have not only experienced the news from this past weekend, but also the trial results of the death of Philando Castile to have a voice.

I’m proud my students are on board. Although they just reworked our mission statement last year, my editors want to make sure they include that needed voice.

And again, it will be their decision on how they work toward the mission and how they will work to include multiple voices in their coverage to show the best story they can

Read More